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X-ray tube with radiator cooling of anode ion, 1900-1925, Museum Boerhaave
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Objects: Caraf, glass and bowl, Bilge Nur Saltik, 2013
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Wendingen, Shell Issue, 1923, Het Nieuwe Instituut
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Vases from ‘The Industrials’ vase-series Copier, A.D., 1961, Collectie Nationaal Glasmuseum Leerdam
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Duran Filter Apparatus, 2015, VBGL
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
'Quartz' Glass Preform, BV TWENTSCHE KABELFABRIEK (TKF)
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Study for Dewar Lights Inside of Vacuum Flasks, David Derksen, 2012-2013, photo: Lotte Stekelenburg
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Fantasia Fibreglass lamps, VALTEC
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Schnittmodell Leitz, 1966, Talens Foto Collection, photo: Johannes Schwartz
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
Glass model of sea slug, Pterotrachea scutata., Blaschka & Sohn, 1882, UNIVERSITY MUSEUM UTRECHT, photo: Lotte Stekelenburg
Glass: Engine of Progress

Objects from the ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ exhibition. Following our idea that the exhibition should really try to express its ideas through objects we went of to find pieces that would embody the story of how glass extended the eye and consequently made the modern world. This made us turn to the depots of famed scientific museums like Teylers Museum, Museum Boerhaave and University Museum Utrecht to gather historical objects that resonate in contemporary design and society.

Next to this we were interested in lifting the hierarchies between different types of makers. Historical objects sit next to experiments by contemporary designers across an industrial product. The objects are related through matching material properties or how they have been worked, hardly ever through purpose. 

Among the highlights are a quartet of Blaschka glass-models. A pure silicate glass preform that is used in the industry to pull thousands of kilometers of optical fibreglass and Hella Jongerius’ Knitted Lamp experiments

a b c d e f g h i j >
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